What is the difference between an SS USB and a USB?

  • SS USB and USB:

    SS refers to SuperSpeed, a new transfer rate that can transfer data at up to 5 Gbit/s (625 MB/s), which is 10 times faster than USB 2.0. Impressive.

    Any USB device can benefit from faster transfer speeds using the SuperSpeed ports. It has been recommended that manufacturers label SuperSpeed ports as SS and that cable manufacturers use a blue color so you know if Superspeed is supported.

    USB 3.0 has been upgraded to USB 3.1, and finally 3.2 in 2017. Each version supports SuperSpeed preserving the original speeds while still increasing the speeds even further.

    If your computer was built after 2017, you probably have USB 3.2 which introduced two new SuperSpeed+ transfer modes over the USB-C connector using two-lane operation, with data rates of 10 and 20 Gbit/s (1250 and 2500 MB/s). So, yeah, it’s fast.

    Any USB device can benefit from faster transfer speeds using the SuperSpeed ports. It is recommended that manufacturers label SuperSpeed ports SS and use blue colored cables, so you know Superspeed is supported.

    USB 3.0 has been upgraded to USB 3.1, and finally 3.2 in 2017. Each version supports SuperSpeed preserving the original speeds while still increasing the speeds even further.

    If your computer was built after 2017, you probably have USB 3.2, which introduced two new SuperSpeed+ transfer modes over the USB-C connector using two-lane operation, with data rates of 10 and 20 Gbit/s (1250 and 2500 MB/s). So, yeah, it’s fast.

    I could go further in-depth, but everything else is pretty geeky (read boring),, and hopefully, I answered your question.

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    The major difference between super speed USB and a USB.

    That is its speed.

    USB is use for normally

    And SS USB is used for for data transfer sometime we say data transfer but it is much more.

    Super speed USB is dedicated to Super speed work as like a Normal USB we can say

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    USB 3.0 adds 5 new wires to the connector (in parallel with the existing 4 USB 2.0 wires for backwards compatability).

    It uses a new full duplex signalling standard over those extra wires to send the higher speed data. Of course, the data cable has improved physical properties to make it possible to run at higher speed.

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    The other answers have correctly answered the question, but I was A2A’d after all those for some reason, so I’m just going to add pretty pictures/charts from Wikipedia[1] :

    • All of the pictured connectors are USB Type A[2] (specifically female), the most common USB connector.
    • All type A connections are forward and backwards compatible, but will operate at the lowest common denominator (speed and/or power) of the connection chain.
    • If either the port, cable, or attached device is operating at a lower speed or requests a lower amount of power, the entire connection will work at the slowest and lowest energy link possible.

    Black is typically USB 2.0 (High Speed)[3] , but can be as low as USB 1.0 (Full Speed, also the name for USB 1.1).

    Blue of that shade is typically USB 3.0 (SuperSpeed)[4] . Sometimes you’ll see this in red. Red or yellow implies that it remains powered for charging devices regardless of the PC being asleep or shutdown.

    USB 3.1 usually comes in an aqua blue/green color (teal?), or a weird faded looking plain blue.

    • USB 2.0 is no less than 40x faster than USB 1.0
    • USB 3.0 is 10x faster than USB 2.0
    • USB 3.1 is 2x faster than USB 3.0

    There’s also different charging rates for most ports, but motherboard manufacturers usually just use the bare minimum charging rate possible. It’s something on the order of 5V, 0.35A. A phone or tablet usually needs 5V 2A for quick charging. Here’s another pretty chart.


    If you have USB 3.0 capable devices (USB 3.0 hubs, external hard drives, flash drives, etc) you should use the 3.0 ports. Otherwise, 2.0’s will suffice. Remember, lowest common denominator.

    If you’re looking for a summary of the more advanced technical aspects, check Rama Krishna Meda’s answer to What’s the difference between the blue and black USB ports?.

    Footnotes

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    USB 3.0 provides more charging current (900 [email protected], about 4.5W) than USB 2.0 (500 [email protected], about 2.5W) when simultaneously sending data, but for standalone charging situations where no data is passed, the USB-BC (battery charging) spec applies, which provides more current than either (1500–2100 [email protected], about 7.5–10.5 W) while working over USB 2.0 wires.

    USB 3.0 has a small advantage in charging speed when simultaneously sending data. However, for dedicated charging, using USB version 2.0 or 3.0 doesn’t matter.

    Note that USB 3.1 supports the new USB-PD (power delivery) capability over USB Type-C connectors, offering several different charging profiles up to 100 W!

    Basically, USB 3.0 are high speed. Many computer manufacturers do not clearly mark USB port versions. Use the Device Manager to determine if your computer has USB 1.1, 2.0, or 3.0 ports:

    1. Open the Device Manager.
    2. In the “Device Manager” window, click the + (plus sign) next to Universal Serial Bus controllers. You will see a list of the USB ports installed on your computer.
    • If your USB port name contains “Universal Host”, your port is version 1.1.
    • If the port name contains both “Universal Host” and “Enhanced Host”, your port is version 2.0.
    • If the port name contains “USB 3.0”, your port is version 3.0.

    laptop manufacturers use the SuperSpeed USB logo to differentiate the port. You can find the ss mark along with the USB logo, which looks something like the following image:

    The SS is for Superspeed. This was introduced with USB3 and 3.1.

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    Usually you want to not pump more than 1–2 amps through a USB cable. The usb spec specifies 28 to 20 awg cable for the power wires on the cables so that becomes the bottleneck in terms of amperage through the cable.

    What alternative higher powered solutions over USB are doing is increasing the voltage to get more power through the cable, a simple example is USB-PD which can negotiate up to 20 volts which at 5 amps and type C cables capable of that higher power draw use 8 pins (4 VCC, 4 GND) total for power delivery vs the two that type A uses (1 VCC, 1 GND), this means that each wire doesn’t need to pass the 2 amps.

    No… the port that you would be looking for would be one with a lightning bolt symbol which indicates that it is carrying extra voltage which is what you need for faster charging, or in the cases of some really big phones, any charging at all.

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    That port is a USB charging port which supplies more juice than regular ones for your devices that are connected and will power them even if your laptop is turned off but connected to power. The 3.0 usb slots are either marked by blue and have 9 pins or have an SS next to them indicating “Super Speed”. you really shouldnt have much issue with this port unless the hardware or drivers are malfunctioning.. Make sure your drivers are up to date from the manufacturer. Always be careful when flashing bios but normally this remedies most hardware issues. Hope this helps.

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    USB-C has unfortunately become a confusing standard. However, when your computer has a “full service”. USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 port or ports, you can do some pretty neat things with just one port:

    • Connect any regular USB device of any generation up to at least USB 3.0
    • Connect Thunderbolt 3 devices (more or less it’s a PCI Express bus running over the USB-C port)
    • Connect an HDMI or DisplayPort display
    • Charge your laptop (use the USB port to provide incoming power)

    The other nice feature that all variants of USB-C have is the orientation-agnostic connector. The connector can be attached either way and it will function.

    Now, unfortunately, not all USB-C ports are created equal:

    • The simplest implementation is simply a USB 3.0 port with a different connector. You still get the advantage of the connector that can attach in either orientation, but you get no other fancy features.
    • Many USB-C ports support USB-C and display functions but may not support Thunderbolt 3 devices. The two main devices you see using Thunderbolt 3 are external graphics processors and very high speed SSDs, so you may be OK without TB3.
    • Some USB-C ports are just USB 3 ports but add “power delivery” allowing you to use it as a charging port. Others may offer Power Delivery compatibility in the outgoing direction – being able to, say, fast charge your phone from your computer.
    • Still other computers have some ports supporting all USB-C features and other ports only supporting some of the features.

    And the worst part is that the USB forum can’t figure out how to name things. USB 3.0 is technically identical, both in specs and connector, to USB 3.1 Gen 1. Then USB 3.1 Gen 2 doubles the bandwidth to 10Gbps but maintains the same classic USB connectors. USB-C can carry either generation. And to add even more insult to injury, we have USB 3.2 on the way which is also being colloquially called Thunderbolt 4, which will also be able to run over USB-C. The naming has become quite a mess and sadly shields what are some incredibly awesome functionalities.

    The technical capabilities of USB-C over plain USB are significant and very useful. It’s unfortunate that the naming confusion may hamper widespread adoption and acceptance. When looking for USB-C computers or devices make sure you research what USB-C capabilities the computer offers and/or the device requires.

    (I wish the USB forum would just come up with some logos that you could print on each port signifying the capabilities it has. Or even better use different colors inside the ports, similar to how blue is the standard USB 3.0 color.)

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